Almost every new innovation goes through three phases. 
  When initially introducing into the market, the process 1. 
  of adoption is slow. The early models are expensive and 
  hard to use, and perhaps even unsafe. The economic 
  impact is relatively great. 2. 
  The second phase is the explosive one, where the innovation 
  was rapidly adopted by a large number of people. It gets 3. 
  cheaper and easier to use and becomes something familiar. 
  And then in the third stage, diffusion of the innovation 
  slows down again, as if it permeates out across the economy. 4. 
  During the explosive phase, whole new industries spring 
  up to produce the new product or innovation, and to service 
  it. For example, during the 1920s, there was dramatic 5. 
  acceleration in auto production, from 1.9 million in 1920 
  to 4.5 million in 1929. This boom was accompanied with all 6. 
  sorts of other essential activities necessary for an 
  auto-based nation: Roads had to been built for the cars to 7. 
  run on; refineries and oil wells, to provide the gasoline; 
  and garages, to repair it. 8. 
  Historically, the same pattern is repeated again and again 
  with innovations. The construction of the electrical system 
  requested an enormous early investment in generation and 9. 
  distribution capacity. The introduction of the radio was 
  followed by a buying spree (无节制的狂热行为) by Americans 
  what quickly brought radios into almost half of all households 10. 
  by 1930, up from nearly none in 1924. 

  答案: 
  1. introducing改为 introduced;
  2. great 改为 small;
  3. was改为is; 
  4. as 后面的 if 去掉;
  5. was 后面加a;
  6. with改为by; 
  7. been改为be; 
  8. it改为them; 
  9. requested改为required; 
  10. what改为that。